Seborrhoeic Dermatitis is a skin condition that is chronic, relapsing and mild in severity.

When found in infants – called Craddle Cap.

This condition is an Inflammation process that affects the skin – areas affected are often the scalp, face, chest, and legs.

There is a scaly, flaky, itchy skin rash that is often slightly pink or red.

Affects the sebaceous glands in the affected areas.

In Adolescents and Adults – area affected is scalp similar to Dandruff or Nasolabial fold.

Symptoms begin gradually and usually first begin on the scalp.

In children – symptoms may last a few days

In Adults – symptoms my last from a few weeks to years.

A specialist needs to be called when self care has no affect on symptoms.

The exact cause is unknown – possible weakened immune system, lack of nutrients, or issues with the Nervous System.

Those patients with certain medical issues such as HIV, Parkinson’s Disease, Stroke are particularly prone to Seborrhoeic Dermatitis.

More often seen in men than women

Symptoms

–  Rash  (face, behind ears, skin folds)
–  Rash color – yellow, white, grayish
–  Redness of skin  –  Eyelashes, Forehead, Nose, Chest, Upper back
–  Flaking of skin  –  Eyelashes, Forehead, Nose, Chest, Upper back
–  Skin itching
–  In Severe Cases
–  Pimples along hairline, behind ears, ear canal, eyebrows, nose, side of nose, chest, upper back
–  Hair loss
–  Thick crusts

Causes

–  The exact cause is unknown – possible weakened immune system, lack of nutrients, or issues with the Nervous System.

–  Another potential cause may involve a reaction to a form of the yeast called Malassezia – though this has not been proven.

–  There may be something related to Genetics, hormonal, or environmental.

–  It may be aggravated by illness, fatigue, change of seasons, lack of sleep, or stress.

–  In children, excessive Vitamin A can cause worsening symptoms.

 

Prevention

–  A clean scalp is extremely important – this prevents worsening symptoms and flare-ups in some cases.  (But not all)

–  OTC  (Over-the-counter) antifungal shampoo.  (Use a few times a week)

–  Both natural and UV radiation helps curb Mallassezia yeast

 

Management/Treatment

 

OTC Medications and Prescription Medications

.  Antifunals

.  Topical Steroids

.   Keratolytics   –  Topical Urea

.   Antihistamines to stop itching

.   Coal tar shampoo

.   Pimecrolimus

.   Isotretinoin  –  as a last resort

 

Phototherapy

Some Dermatologists recommend using photodynamic Therapy using UV-A and UV-B laser or red and blue LED light.

 

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